Sunday, 30 September 2012

Village Planning

For this assignment I will focus on developing one of the three community hubs located on the site, each hub will be almost identical in terms of function and space arrangements.

 
 
 In theory these hubs will act as a template to be copied and duplicated as this model for future community hubs allows societies to live in a balance between built-up and natural areas. It enables societies to live in collaboration with a number of economic, social and environmental requirements and services, reducing humanity's ecological footprint.
 

This Community hub in particular is able to comfortably house five tiered stories following the natural contours of the hill.

 
Sketchup Model Level Templates
 
 
Sketch Up Model Development
 




Basic Site Animation

 
video
 
 
 
Contour Templates  - the area each level could potentially fill 
 
Level 1
 
 
 
Level 2
 
 
 
Level 3
 
 
 
Level 4
 


Friday, 21 September 2012

Site and Community Planning


I have the idea of integrating and making the community hubs disappear into and extrude out of the landscape, so that rooves become gardens, walls become contours and the building becomes apart of the landscape. All architural elements that extrude out of the landscape will have to bo no the southern sides of the village centres.

The new village locations suit the site's contours, wind direction, and avoid any future site flooding.  
General Proposed Site Areas
 
 
My architectural proposal is an extension for Project 01 in terms that my idea extends from the 'Flower of Life' or sharing pattern the group developed. The goal associated with the developed pattern was to break down the village into more localise hubs to create richer and more diverse communities through the principle of sharing.
 
Village Planning - Keeping inline with Project One's pattern 
 
The hubs integrated with agricultural precincts will offer better opportunities for trade and resource sharing, reduce transport and distribution needs, and ultimately develop a more sustainable future by reducing growth in urbanisation. This model allows societies to live in a balance between built-up and natural areas. It enables societies to live in collaboration with a number of economic, social and environmental requirements and services. Though community development and environmental education Woodfordia will enrich the lives of all residents and festival patrons and reduce humanity's ecological footprint. 
 
Agricultural and Vegetation Precinct Connections 
 
 
It is important that the hubs provide interwoven sharing and give-take relationships between its people, the built environment and the nature environment; allowing direct and in-direct benefits to establish and allowing its people to do more with fewer resources.
 

Site and Community Planning 
 


Monday, 17 September 2012

Beginnings of my Architecture Fiction

The Queensland Folk Federation is a not-for-profit organisation with a vision of inclusive, creative and inspiring community growth of cultures and traditions. Over the years the organisation has become a symbol of environmental stability, de-urbanisation, diversity and human rights. The Queensland Folk Federation is aware of earth's ever-growing issues and believes that sustainability is more than improving the environmental quality of an area, it’s about community development, decision-making processes, awareness, involvement and engagement. Its about reaching a common goal and maintaining a balance between economic development and environmental protection. The federation's past history, committed volunteers, current sustainable beliefs and future goals will and has aided in creating a benchmark for communities and cities elsewhere to adapt.­
In 1987 (Friday March 13) the federation held a small event dedicated to the arts, humanities and lore in Maleny at the local showgrounds that attracted 900 people. Over the next 8 years, the festival at Maleny grew rapidly and was receiving attendances of more than 50,000 people. By 1993 the Folk Festival outgrew this site and organisers went in search of a new home.
Once degraded pastures, Woodfordia began in 1994 as a 500 acre landscaped cultural parkland located in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland on Jinibara Country. The commitment of the Queensland Folk Federation over the years to sustainability, de-urbanisation and environmental restoration of habitats, biodiversity and eco-systems has become integral to the festival. The organisers always had big dreams of what the folk festival could become and developed a 500 year plan for the site that assisted in Woodfordia's evolution and helped the site become what it is and stands for today.

2012 marked an important year in Woodfordia's elevotion process, from a vegetated festival parkland to a ..


 
Developing Site Images
 
 



Sunday, 16 September 2012

Story Telling

I am leaning toward the idea of presenting my final project in the form of a short film. I shall present a documentary almost with a timeline of events, considering the tutors applauded project one's timeline storyboard band. I believe a visual presentation with a predetermined explanation will illustrate and convey design intensions better than a board and a speech.



Below is an example of a similar sustainable architectural story  by Bobby Bol from Studio Innua Architecture and Design:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlzS__N-4gU
 

I am drawn to this presentaion as an example i wish to follow because of its consistency and the simplicity of the graphics, the story told is very easy to follow -  a lay person would be able to understand and learn about the thinking processes involved in design sustainable community developments.
 
Below is a quick fly through of the sketchup site model I am developing for the project,  it is taken as if driving down Woodrow Road which borders the eastern edge of the site.

video

 Driving down Woodrow Road

Saturday, 15 September 2012

Brief and Site Requirements

Permanent Sustainable Community Brief and Site Requirements:

· Waste Water Treatment Plant (the site currently has a closed loop water system)
· Water Storage (during festivals the site uses 6.2 million litres of water over 6 days)
· Waste disposal and recycling system (currently Recycles 100m3 of cardboard and 10 tonnes of co-mingled recyclable waste with 3 different bin options are provided for waste – organic waste (which goes to an offsite methane plant), comingle (recyclables) and general waste.)
· Amenity Blocks (at present the site has 42 permanent blocks)
· Permanent electrical reticulation
· Agricultural Precincts
· Greenhouse
· Nursery
· Equipment Storage
· Transport and Parking facilities
· All weather roads ( currently there are 2118 named streets throughout the site)
· Landscaped festival precinct areas (volunteers have planted 95,000 trees and 600 species on the festival site since 1994)
· Amphitheatres, community gathering and stages
· Residential Precinct (the festival has an aggregate attendance greater than 117,000)
· Disability facilities
· Committee and Artist Precinct (folk festival has over 2,000 artists, performers and presenters; programmed events, running end to end, would fill 70 x 24hour days with entertainment)
· Commercial Precincts (the site currently has over 160 craft, merchandise and information stalls, volunteers have covered more than 13888m2 with tents and structures for its venues)
· General Stores (there are 2 onsite general stores)
· Cafes and Restaurants (together at present there are 46 cafes and restaurants spread across the site)
· Bars (site currently has 13 bars and adult festivilians on average drinks less than 2 drinks per day)
· Doctors surgery, first aid and health clinics
· Security and police station
· Children's festival and daycare


www.woodfordfolkfestival.com

Friday, 14 September 2012

Understanding and Establishing Site


The Woodford Folk Festival is one of the only major festivals in the world to have a permanent home. The current site reaches over 500 acres with the festival grounds consisting of 13 bars, 46 selected cafes & restaurants, 160 craft, merchandise and information stalls, an on-site doctor’s surgery, 2 general stores and an internet cafe.  Some of these venues also include space dedicated for a children's festival, a visual arts lane and Arti Arti, amphitheatres, a nursery, disability camping facilities, shuttle bus stops, a greenhouse, a free homeopathic clinic, committee room and much more.  

Existing Village Area Analysis  
Green = Licensed Bars
Blue = Culturally diverse food stalls and restaurants
 Orange = public specialty venues  

Existing Village Area Analysis over 3D Contour Model
 
The existing site currently has the main permanent festival village located in the low-lying areas following the creek line. Grassed and vegetated zones on the neighbouring hills are dedicated to festival acts and stages. The remaining un-noted areas are left for vegetation regeneration zones, patron camping and specialty service areas.
 Area Zone Analysis 2012
 
My site proposal for 2050 is to move the permanent village out of the low-lying, possible future flood-prone area and integrate both the festival and village zones into festive community hubs, allowing the creek to be cleaned up, revived and revegetated.
 

2050 Area Zone Proposal
 
 
The below diagram explores wind directions, the sun's location, visual and physical connections. 

 
 
2050 Area Zone Planning

Wednesday, 12 September 2012

Project Two Initial Thoughts

The requirements for project two is to establish ‘Architectural Fiction’, a well thought of story or proposition for the site in future years. Building on from project one, our group chose the year 2050 with a goal that Woodfordia’s architecture will promote sustainable sharing and provide an equal balance between built-up and natural environments. The architecture will incorporate and enhance closed-loop services, environmental restoration of habitats, biodiversity and eco-systems through its design and function, as well as through collective sustainable education, socialised sharing and community lifestyle factors.

Project one explored architectural concepts and forms based on the famous pattern the flower of life, and decided it was important to create a give-take-give sharing relationship between users and the built environment. Concepts considered allowances for maximising natural energy resources; they considered surfaces areas and highlighted orientation in terms of absorbing more solar energy. Forms suggested roof structures be used for agricultural purposes where people can yield various types of crops and vegetation, and incorporating farming into the lifestyle of the building. From Project One, my vision of Woodfordia 2050 was:

Woodford Folk Festival will become a regular and more popular celebration of sharing lore, environmental stability, de-urbanisation, diversity and human rights. Its localised sharing implementation strategies and sustainable community development will lead by example and set a benchmark for communities and cities elsewhere to adapt their social trends routines and lifestyles to those that are environmentally aware. The festival's past history, committed volunteers, current sustainable beliefs and future goals will aid in making this transition successful as sustainability is more than improving the environmental quality of an area, it’s about community development, decision-making processes, awareness, involvement and engagement. About reaching a common goal and maintaining a balance between economic development and environmental protection.

The question remaining for project two is how will this be achieved architecturally?
 


Inspirational Images and Concepts

 
References: